Trick bindings.

TravisNWTravisNW Posts: 84 Baller
edited April 2014 in Trick
I've used Wiley's mostly, and slalom with reflex. When I used the reflex for trick it was great I had a better feel for the ski not to mention it's more comfortable. The problem I run into is my rear shin hits the release usually when landing flips, not the real clean ones but during minor or major faults it hits. I've considered a shin guard but really want a release that isn't in the way. I see fluid motion has the air release I think it's called, any feedback on this? Also this is a hand pass only trick, do I need a release? Fm also offers a fixed set up, thoughts on this? All Comments and recommendations appreciated.

Comments

  • MrJonesMrJones Posts: 1,763 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    Reflex makes a padded release protector. That way it is on the ski and you don't have to mess with a shin guard. Seems that I have seen it on a lot of the higher end trickers releases. Might give that a try if you don't already have it.
    TravisNW
  • Jody_SealJody_Seal Posts: 2,629 Mega Baller
    @TravisNW, My observations (as I spend a lot of time a Picko's) is that most upper end trickers tend to use Wiley's on their hand ski's and Reflex on their toe ski's. Reason is that their is a higher percent chance of pre-release during flips and handle pass line tricks. From experience Stephen (my son) utilized a Reflex binding system on his hand ski for a year. That year his average went down nearly 1000 points and the binding pre released at both Regional's and Nationals Costing him a National overall championship. It has been about 8 years since he tried another Reflex binding but that is now on his toe ski where he really needs it.
    Hobby Boats can be expensive when the hobbyist is limited on their own skill and expertise.


    TravisNW
  • TravisNWTravisNW Posts: 84 Baller
    Jody, do you see more full rubber wraps or with Eva heal and or toe?
  • Jody_SealJody_Seal Posts: 2,629 Mega Baller
    A number of the Pickos group Cory,Adam, Steve-O etc, Use a EVA heal piece. Toe Strap and a ratchet heal piece that Cory gets from ???? on the rear. Steve-O just uses a rear High wrap cut down to fit on the trick ski for his rear boot.
    Hobby Boats can be expensive when the hobbyist is limited on their own skill and expertise.


  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,812 Infinite Pandas
    There is a debate as to whether a release is needed at all for tricks. You can get hurt either way. My release system is to protect the equipment as much as my legs. I have nasty scars from just a few sets on a Reflex. Shin guards help but are a pain. Most use them when working on a new trick where they fall frequently. The padding over the Silveretta clip helps a lot. But a few of my scars are from the edge of my ski - staying in is the only thing that would help that. Most people don't have a problem with kicking the release unless they fall.

    Hardshells seem to offer a small performance advantage. This comes at a cost of way more maintenance and expense. I can go through several shells a season. Premature release is also a serious problem. Premature release on some tricks is dangerous. Reflex users have solved this by mounting a snowboard strap to hold down the boot with no release for hands. Unclip and the release is normal for toes.

    Wileys are heavy, a bit uncomfortable for an extended run and pretty hard to release from. With enough wraps and plastic, the feel might be as good as a hardshell. They are bombproof and well proven.

    Rear bindings are a very interesting area. I learned with just nonskid and was able to do some pretty advanced tricks with nothing. A rubber toe loop cut down a bit from a slalom toe kick was standard for a long time - and still my personal choice now. Kirk uses that plus a heel strap made from bicycle innertube. Some heel straps are more substantial than that. I have seen half hardshells (no cuff) as a rear boot. And I have seen cut down rubber boots. Remember that the back foot should not be driving the trick so you must develop the skills to ignore all that support for your back foot. A standard toe kick with an easy heel strap is a good choice until your skiing demands something else.

    EVA is lighter than rubber but tends to stiffen up quickly and markedly. Monitor your EVA. For heel rubber replacement EVA is pretty much all good. The toepiece is tougher - Kirk's jump bindings are all EVA Wileys and I had to drill out flexing holes all over the toe piece to get them comfortable enough to work. (They warned me when I bought them but I spec'ed it anyway.) Now those bindings are great - and a bit lighter.

    Eric
    TravisNW
  • BraceMakerBraceMaker Posts: 3,496 Mega Baller
    Possibly time to try out the newest sponsor's plate - you already have a boot yes?
    MattPchris_logan
  • TravisNWTravisNW Posts: 84 Baller
    I think I'm going to fix a boot to the plate. I can always go back to rubber. I think the ski is so small it's not a large enough lever to likely cause injury.

    Will a fluid motion be better or a reflex? Or make my own? I've heard the fluid motion's chunky ness decreases responsiveness/ ski perception. But it seems like it may mount better.

    On another note have you all been tricking? My first set was Sunday looking forward to tomorrow.
  • BraceMakerBraceMaker Posts: 3,496 Mega Baller
    FM's boot is a bit "fuller" fitting than the boots utilized by Reflex -

    A large aspect of this is that the instep area is a bit looser - the "wrap" style liners or instance work really well in the FM, and can be too tight in the reflex boot.

    Big thing to remember is that the FM uses a shell designed to have a full liner for aggressive roller blades - The Reflex requires a thinner or atleast more squished liner.

    On the flip, the FM has a really stable base on the ski - the reflex is just sort of clamped down.
    TravisNW
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