New Aira D3 Trick

dchristmandchristman Posts: 833 Mega Baller
edited July 2015 in Trick
Anybody tried it yet? Trick skis certainly don't generate the hype that new slalom skis get, but this is a bit of a departure (for D3) from the shape that's been a standard for over 30 years.
Patience is the key to Joy.
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Comments

  • MattPMattP Posts: 5,879 Moderator
    @Sledgehammer I know you have been on the new one. What are your thoughts on the new shape?
  • dchristmandchristman Posts: 833 Mega Baller
    So Ellie reviewed the Aira ... see the Home page. She says "D3 recommends that skiers move up an inch in ski size." Is that recommendation directed primarily for the hand pass? How does it work for toes? Is it just a collegiate ski? The old trickers here still do toes :)
    Patience is the key to Joy.
  • MattPMattP Posts: 5,879 Moderator
  • dchristmandchristman Posts: 833 Mega Baller
    @MattP I'm sure she does, but does she do them on and Aira an inch longer than what she's used to? Does she use different skis for hand and toe pass?
    Patience is the key to Joy.
  • Chef23Chef23 Posts: 4,838 Mega Baller
    @dchristiman how many points do you trick? I think that probably impacts some decisions on ski sizing.
    Mark Shaffer
  • dchristmandchristman Posts: 833 Mega Baller
    Thanks for responding, @EHorton95 . What size/model ski do you use for toes, and did you try an Aira in that size?

    I have a 41" CX and a 40" HC Limited that I currently use. Prior to these skis, I used a 39" Kidder for many years... for everything. Toes are my stronger tricks. Needless to say, I haven't landed a flip on that 39" ski in a long time. I got the 41" CX two years ago, and it renewed my enthusiasm for tricks. While I can do a lot of the tricks on the CX I used to do, I can only describe it as feeling too big. Last fall I got the 40" HC. I'm more comfortable on that, especially for toes, but I can't help but thinking a 41" Aira might work well for toes and still improve hand tricks for me. The recommended size doesn't look like it's changed on the D3 website... I'm in the 41" range for both skis.

    @Chef23 I don't see points as having any impact on my decision on ski sizing, it's more a matter of comfort. Besides, I don't have any recent scores that I'm proud to mention :) Last fall was the first tournament I skied since 1991. I did qualify for nationals by ranking with one stand-up pass plus three tricks. Old guy qualifications for tricks are embarrassingly low. Injuries early in the season this year prevented me from doing toes, so even lower scores. My best score was something in the 4300 range back in 1983 when I had paper runs around 6000. I think somewhere in the upper 3000's is probably realistic for me now. Of course a new ski might double that :p
    Patience is the key to Joy.
  • Chef23Chef23 Posts: 4,838 Mega Baller
    @dchristman you are a way better tricker than I am. I think for someone not flipping and mostly doing surface toes a bigger ski isn't a hindrance. At your level I could see it making a difference.
    Mark Shaffer
  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,032 MM Trick Skier / Eccentric Person
    This is so cool to see interest in trick stuff! I really want to get on the Aira and see how it works.

    Regarding ski size, I remember a couple decades ago watching skis get huge and wide. Maybe marketing hype or just a fad but those oversize skis just didn't catch on. A rebound effect sent people to small skis. This caused an increase in boat speeds to compensate. People weren't that comfortable on tiny skis so the manufacturers added drag to compensate for the speed and made the skis bigger. The draggy profile gives a nice feel that we have gotten to like. With the tiny wakes of the modern boats, a slower speed helps the wakes. (Adjust rope length anytime you adjust speed.) So skis are getting bigger to let us slow down a bit.

    Regarding a hand vs toe ski, it depends on the kind of toe tricks you like. The toe steps, TWOs, or any big power toe trick will like the same features as a hand ski. The finesse and balance tricks (T5s, T7s, TS and such) will work better with different ski characteristics (and speeds?). The basic toes (TB, TF, R, R, TO, TWB, TWF) will do fine with either ski - as long as whichever ski doesn't catch edges suddenly (strangely, some pure toe skis have been the most catchy - go figure). A lot of people slow down for toes which seems to add a consistent drag to the ski which is very predictable. So maybe you don't need two skis. Maybe you do - I've done both different speeds and different skis (and both). But now I'm skiing same ski, same speed.

    Where the Aira fits in will be interesting. The old D3 hardedge Custom is a great ski to start from. Hopefully I can get a ride on one soon. And thanks to Ellie for her input!

    Eric
  • EHorton95EHorton95 Posts: 4 Baller
    @dchristman I use a 41 D3 CX for toes. I'm pretty small too (120 lbs and 5'4). I did not try an Aira in a 41. However, when I tried to doe toes on the 42 Aira, although it definitely was too big, it felt like it would be a really good toe ski if it was a 41.
  • dchristmandchristman Posts: 833 Mega Baller
    Thanks @EHorton95 . As a D3 Team Member, perhaps you could get a 41" Aira to compare with your CX for toes to round out your review?
    Patience is the key to Joy.
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