Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

______________
12" White Stickers
______________
BallOfSpray $5 Donation
______________
BallOfSpray $10 Donation

Coaching advice

IlivetoskiIlivetoski Posts: 1,140 Crazy Baller
Any thoughts?











Comments

  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172
    Great skiing!! Two biggest things I see, 1) Get higher on the boat in your pull-out, you'll be amazed how that changes things. 2) You are getting off the handle and reaching too early on 2/4....I'll look more tomorrow - great work
    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • skibugskibug Posts: 1,972
    edited May 2016
    yep...need to be higher on the boat for the gates. See still image. You need to be another 12" higher on where the line crossed the boat gunnel; which will put you higher on the turn in. This creates more angle and less speed into ball 1.




    Bob Grizzi
  • 2tracmind2tracmind Posts: 49 Baller
    Really athletic skiing. Agreed on the gate width. A couple other observations:
    - during gate glide your hips and shoulders are pointing towards the wake, as a LFF this common, try to keep your hips and shoulders as square as possible ( pointing at 2/4/6). This should allow the lower body to initiate the turn and you will be in a accelerating position sooner.
    - your arms appear to be coming away from your body at edge change, sending you on a narrower path to the ball. Try to keep the handle low and close through the edge change and until your reach.

    There is a lot of solid elements to your skiing, just some little cleaning up.
  • MattPMattP Posts: 5,973 Mega Baller
  • IlivetoskiIlivetoski Posts: 1,140 Crazy Baller
    Well, I'm getting down 32 every single pass. I don't know why but it just isn't falling. I have no clue what I'm doing that is keeping me from the pass because I am getting starts that are giving me no excuses. Got some video today if someone else can possibly figure it out





  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172
    edited June 2016
    Fantastic improvement, that's going down soon. You have everything you need to run that pass. Now, don't hate me for saying this but you I believe your start is still hurting you a bit. BIG improvement, but you are still drifting back a bit too far before you turn in, and you're turning in under too much load, and the result is a more direct w path to one, with a lot of speed, and a late exit out of the turn. It's runnable that way, you'd just be amazed how much easier a great start makes that pass, and how much more angle you can create by initiating your turn in from a higher point, while you are a bit more free from the load of the boat. Perhaps think about pulling out nice and high, and matching the speed of the boat in your glide at your highest point, and turning in towards one at that moment. You will create a lot more angle without all of the speed. I think your late exit out of one is the reason why you give up your arms a bit early into two. You are one day away from stroking that. Good luck
    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172
    edited June 2016
    Even though you are getting up nice and high, here is where you are actually initiating your turn in...
    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172

    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • IlivetoskiIlivetoski Posts: 1,140 Crazy Baller
    @Texas6 start my pull out later? Because I am getting wider than 2,4,6. If I'm pulling out too early I could be losing ground on the boat by the time I'm going in for the gate?
  • Than_BoganThan_Bogan Posts: 6,020 Mega Baller
    Oh yeah -- super close. To try to answer your last question: Although you may need to adjust your timing a little, I think the bigger deal is to build more speed as you move up, so that you are going a similar speed to the boat and thus can "stay out there."

    We spent almost all of our time at The Denali Summit on this one point. But if there's a short version it's that you want to initiate your move up by leaning leftward and forward. There's no "away from the boat" component at all. This will gain you speed very rapidly without a lot of load. (The first time I tried it I went about 100 feet past my usual turn-in point and couldn't stop laughing. Did it a little a less aggressively the next time...)

    The weird part is, you can't really see someone doing this, because what happens is you move with the ski and you never actually go forward much. But now that I am aware of it, I constantly see every pro's move up looks like they are with the ski and nearly every amateur looks like they are falling behind the ski.
    Nathaniel Bogan -- GUT Padawan
  • Chef23Chef23 Posts: 5,545 Mega Baller
    @Ilivetoski I think you need to adjust where you focus your eyes. You said you are getting wider than 2,4,6. That isn't really a good judgement point because that width varies with line length. I think should focus on the angle of the rope on the boat as that is a consistent judgement of width at the gates. You might think of pulling out later or longer so that you aren't losing speed and width before your turn in.

    I also agree with @Than_Bogan on leaning left and forward to help you get width more easily.
    Mark Shaffer
  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172
    What @Chef23 & @Than_Bogan said. The idea is to match your maximum pull-out width/height with a glide speed consistent with the speed of the boat - that way you feel just barely free of the pull on the rope from the boat as you initiate your turn in toward the gates. When you wait to feel the load from the boat, prior to turning into the gates....two things happen.
    1.) It's harder to turn your ski and generate proper angle through the gates towards one ball. Oftentimes the result here is a more direct line toward the buoy, instead of creating space for yourself in front of it.
    2.) Speed is generated too early pushing you fast into one ball.

    This is easier said than done, but like everything else in skiing, it becomes more automatic with repetition, and when you get it right, its very easy to feel the difference it makes.
    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • skinutskinut Posts: 369 Baller
    It's been said above, but if you really want to see how much you width you are loosing before the turn in watch your 2nd 32 off video and use the frame forward (>) and reverse buttons (<) on your key board. Watch yourself in relation to the Bimini support bars. I realize the camera moves a little so the perspective changes but you can definitely see the loss of width. Get the timing down and you will own that pass.
  • Texas6Texas6 Posts: 2,172
    @livetoski - let us know how the progress goes. Good luck
    Daryn Dean - Lakes of Katy, TX
    ***Robbed out of Hundreds of Panda Worthy Posts***
  • RichRich Posts: 248 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    I agree with Than, stay with the ski. Get your arms straight behind the boat, hips up, that will give you more power off the 2nd wake. You are close.
Sign In or Register to comment.