Do skis wear out?

MikeMcMikeMc Posts: 4 Baller
Do modern slalom skis ware out after 2 - 3 seasons shortline use? Or do the new skis just keep getting better making the older ski feel worn out?

Comments

  • Pat MPat M Posts: 475 Solid Baller
    Depends on the ski. Some skis are done after two seasons and others last 5-6 years.
    That's why people flex test skis to make sure the numbers are still correct. Also depends on how much skiing you do. If I skied as much as @Horton then I would need a new stick every year - two at the most.

    And yah skis just keep getting better.
    Than_Bogan
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 342 Baller
    Yes skis do wear out. It depends on how much and the brand of ski as mentioned above.
    Dave Macchi / Nautique promo team member
  • MikeMcMikeMc Posts: 4 Baller
    1-2 sets a day 6 days a week 6 month season. On a old D3 RCX
  • HortonHorton Posts: 23,507 Administrator
    edited November 14
    @MikeMc RCX is how many years old?

    Without getting into a in-depth composite engineering discussion.... does the suspension on a car wear out? Do running shoes wear out? Does everything wear out with use?

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    Jordan
  • hemlockhemlock Posts: 78 Baller
    A socket wrench doesn't wear out. :wink:

    The OP has a good question.
    But I am interested if there's been any experiments on the matter. Has anyone bought two of the exact same ski... skied one for 500 sets, and then pulled the other one out of the plastic bag and skied it?
    Is there a difference?
    (I would assume ski manufacturer engineers/designers have done this in some way or another already)

    I'm guessing the ability for a ski to flex and rebound makes a difference to the performance of the ski. And since a ski isn't made of metal like a socket wrench, it may lose it's ability to flex and rebound over time, or over use.
    Perhaps it's not just about the shape of the ski that makes a good ski.

    How important is it for a ski to have that flex and rebound when you make turn after turn?

    This might be the mind set for the average amateur skier.
    Let's say you have a $1000 and looking to purchase a new ski. You are a long to middle short line skier... what do you buy?
    An older pro (best shape and materials) ski with many sets on it?
    Or a brand new ski, but not with the best design or material?


  • GloersenGloersen Posts: 647 Crazy Baller
    Skiers wear out, my flex #'s keep getting higher; it sucks sometimes...
    stå løpet ut
    Than_Bogan
  • LeonLLeonL Posts: 1,896 Crazy Baller
    edited November 14
    @hemlock ask a mechanic if he's ever finally wore out a socket. With enough use metal wears, thus a socket will wear out. Second law of thermodynamics. Just being a nerd, no offense intended.
    Leon Leonard Stillwater Lake KY - SR Driver SR Judge
  • AdamCordAdamCord Posts: 460 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    When I worked for O'Brien we had some pretty cool R&D/QC toys including a tension/compression test machine. I did one cycle test with it on an Elite ski. I had always planned to get other skis and test them in order to have data to compare to, but I never found the time before leaving that really fun job.

    Therefore we should take this data with a grain of salt. The Elite skis were made with RTM and while they were slightly heavier than your standard compression molded skis, they were MUCH stronger. On one comparison test I did the breaking strength was almost twice that of a normal compression molded carbon fiber ski. That's why this data may be misleading...

    What I did was mount the ski in the machine and do a 3 point bend like you do to measure flex. Also like when measuring flex, the displacement was held constant, and the load force on the ski was measured. The load force was pretty high, and I can't remember the spacing between the points where the ski was mounted (this was almost 10 years ago), but the trend is obvious.



    One thing to keep in mind is this is a closeup on the Y axis, so the change in load is actually VERY small over 16,000 cycles of over 600lbs. What I found more interesting was the initial quick drop in load. Maybe that's part of why a ski may feel great the first few sets, and then not so much?

    Anyway like I said this was a special ski and I wish I had done this test with some other skis. I suspect your average compression molded ski would drop off faster, but I don't know how much
    bishop8950MattP
  • BoozeBooze Posts: 273 Baller
    @MikeMc - this topic has been covered in the forum from numerous angles.

    ...a side note on my one long-term "A-B" comparison experience. I skied on a Mastercraft Mirage from '87 thru '95. I can guarantee many many many sets were skied on it, and the last year or two there were many 35off sets.
    Around '94 IIRC, KLP was liquidating the old stock of Mastercrafts and I picked up another 66 Mirage. It skied almost exactly like the old one. My memory is telling me I literally could not tell the difference.
    Were that generation of Mastercraft skis built THAT well? Or were my skills just not good enough to discern the difference?
  • HortonHorton Posts: 23,507 Administrator
    @booze with carbon/PVC skis I would expect the exact opposite story. That old MasterCraft was glass and PU. It was slow as heck right out of the box.

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  • MikeMcMikeMc Posts: 4 Baller
    Got the ski new in 2008. I understand and appreciate the feedback as everything wears out. I am not a high end skier but run 35 off consistently on it, when water warms up it seems to stall at finish of turn. This did not happen in the past. When I skied new ARC - it felt familiar but much more alive. Thanks to all for the input. Planning on a new ski spring 2018.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 23,507 Administrator
    @MikeMc If you run 35 you are a legit short line skier. You should think about a new ski every 300 or 400 rides (+/-).

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  • wawaskrwawaskr Posts: 106 Baller
    @Horton when you say “rides” are you refering to one set (6 passes through course)?
    Matt
  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,031 MM Trick Skier / Eccentric Person
    Even if the ski doesn't break down, skis get stale. Your form adapts too well to the ski and you start getting lazy. A new ski will be different enough to force you to be aware and respond. There's a balance between comfortably knowing a ski and taking it for granted. Getting a new ski every couple years will make you a better skier.

    Sometimes it's the skier not the ski.

    Eric
  • HortonHorton Posts: 23,507 Administrator
    @wawaskr Yes. More or less.

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