Old Ski, New Ski, New-Used Boat and a Broken Rib

Tbone71857Tbone71857 Posts: 22 Baller
Our family is enjoying our new/used 2013 19' Chaparral H20 - I grew up on the water and my teenage girls have the chance to do so now! I purchased a used slalom ski, KD 6500, and it almost "killed me" - I'm really sure it's user error but I now understand why skiing on newer technology is important. I cracked a rib going over the second wake last weekend. I reached out to Tom Asher at Stokes and purchased the EVO-2 rib protector ski vest (it comes in today). He also recommended two newer slalom skis. Therefore, at the local Dallas boat show last night, I purchased the Radar Senate Alloy slalom ski. I will try it out next week once we return from a wedding this weekend.

Our lake (Grapevine) is rough so skiing is sometimes out of the question - so we wakeboard. Girls love the sport and they've only been doing this for a month or so. One kid loves to ski and the other loves to wakeboard. I slalom any chance that I can - even chasing down the other random slalom skier that magically appears on the lake (good grief - we are a dying breed). My wife loves to slalom as well.

The boat has a decent wake at 32 MPH (it's not a true ski-boat but I deplore the $150K wake-surfing boats so we went for a used bow-rider). Basically, it's the type of boat I grew up with back in the day. As long as we are on the water, the family loves the idea of water sports. Growing up in Arkansas, we lived in the same neighborhood as Wade Cox - small world and he's done extremely well at this sport.

I'm looking forward to the tips/suggestions/ideas from this board!

Comments

  • JetsetrJetsetr Posts: 229 Baller
    You will like the Senate Alloy...I upgraded from my Butterknife to that ski recently...

    You don’t have to have the latest and greatest to enjoy time on the water with your family..those memories will last for ever...

    Was looking at open bow fish and ski boats, but ran into a low time (for the year) 89 Brendella this spring for 3K...put about another 1K in upgrades (GPS speedo, new alternator, prop rehab, trailer upgrades etc). For my level of skiing it’s great...runs perfect, no issues other than the new post mount I fabricated. I can do all the work on the boat myself so that helps...

    Have fun, enjoy family time...that’s what it’s all about...
    WaterSkier12Tbone71857
  • ScottScottScottScott Posts: 733 Crazy Baller
    edited July 2018
    I'm thinking that an over the front wipe out is more user error as you say, more than the older ski. There are certainly advantages to the development evolution in newer skies, but technique in terms of stack and alignment is the main thing that will minimize the over the front wipe-outs. You may not be serious enough to think it warrants lessons, but some of the video lesson options for not much money may be a good alternative to improve technique a little to help you enjoy it a little more, and give some good info that can help you help the kids get started in a good direction.
    vtmechengJetsetr
  • Tbone71857Tbone71857 Posts: 22 Baller
    Very good advice and thank you. Yes, I've had a lot of time this week to watch video and to read about technique. Here's my deal, I'm 45 and have skied casually with many years apart from season to season. Now, we have a boat and I'm really getting into the sport on a weekly basis. Compared to my 18 year old body, today, I am so much stronger, faster and more aggressive than I was back then. I'm reaching speeds that are simply exhilarating today compared to how I skied then. Therefore, my spine alagiment, weight and technique all need to improve as when I do fall, it hurts. My rib breaking fall occurred when I fell backwards after hitting the second wake, landing on my face and right chest side.
  • vtmechengvtmecheng Posts: 393 Solid Baller
    One thing to keep in mind when watching all those instructional videos, they are behind direct drive ski boats. Your H2O will have a bigger wake that you need to be mindful of. I occasionally ski behind my dad's old 18 foot Chaparral IO and that second wake can get me if I'm skiing like it's a Nautique. Just remember to take it easy behind that boat, speed and aggression can be fun but getting hurt isn't.
  • ScottScottScottScott Posts: 733 Crazy Baller
    edited July 2018
    A little too much weight on the back foot will increase the impact of the wake likely pulling you forward. Way too much weight on the back foot will shoot the ski into the air landing you on your back. Theres also a point in between a little and a lot where the 1st wake will put you a little farther back, then you are way back as you hit the 2nd wake (again shooting the ski into the air.) Bad alignment will add a twist to that backwards fall. You need to resist the natural tendency to get defensive and put weight back when hitting the wakes. With good weight distribution and stack there will be a bump, but the ski will stay more horizontal as it bumps up over the wake and your weight distribution will stay the same. A lot of the over-the-front wipe-outs happen when you naturally let your hips turn toward the boat (especially off side.) When you hit/jump the wake, and the ski looses contact with the water, the ski turns in the direction of your hips, when you land the ski basically stops as you keep going. Push trailing side of hip forward so your hips/torso is pointed in the direction you are intending to go.
  • Tbone71857Tbone71857 Posts: 22 Baller
    Your comments ARE spot on! Yes, I've been putting way too much weight on my back leg -luckily, a friend snapped a few photos of my turns and it showed a scary sight - ski tip elevated way too high with only my fin in the way during my turn, my alignment is askew, etc. Your comment about my hips turning towards the boat is so helpful - thank you! What the videos have shown me is to keep a solid posture and "pull" against the boat as I cross the wake. As for my wake - honestly, I've never had the "luxury" to ski behind a true ski boat. All of my skiing has been behind I/Os. My Chaparral has had the "best" wake and I've enjoyed "learning" how to become more aggressive without pushing the limit - until last week.

    I have my new EVO 2 Stokes jacket now and will try it this week. It's very tight and I like the compression it provides for my ribs.

    Question - for free skiing (non-course), should I maintain a 75' rope or go 12 to 15 off? It appears my wake is most narrow at 12 to 15 off - would that help at all?
  • ScottScottScottScott Posts: 733 Crazy Baller
    edited July 2018
    I learned up to the point of getting through the course at 15off 28mph behind my sea ray bow rider before the bug was just too much and we splurged on a Prostar..... I'm sure people were laughing, seeing us run through the course in our bow rider... Enjoy your Chaparral and the family activities, and time skiing, it can certainly be done. Yes, the shorter rope will put you at a narrower part of the wake, and various distances will have different sizes so experiment. Also try different trim, my boat was best trimmed all the way down. As I was working on the course also, I only used 15 off, but even shorter could help.
  • Tbone71857Tbone71857 Posts: 22 Baller
    Thank you, Scott. Too funny on the course boat as that would be me as well. Our lake doesn't have a course so it's free skiing and technique drills for me when the water is calm.
  • vtmechengvtmecheng Posts: 393 Solid Baller
    Definitely try different lengths to find where the wake is softest. Also try different speeds, trims, and weight placement. My dad's Chaparral is best trimmed down, 15' off, with a heavier person in the bow (like 250 lbs). In that setup I can attack the wakes without issue, though like @ScottScott said it will highlight any poor form.
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