2019 Ski Nautique Walkthrough

1danlay1danlay Posts: 2 Baller


The crew at AWS did a very thorough walkthrough of the 2019 Ski Nautique (Correct Craft) waterski boat. It has been a long time since slalom skiing has seen this level of inovation in a boat. If you get a opportunity to ski behind this vessel you should definitely take it! Correct Craft has set the bar once again with this top of the line product.
ozskiBulldogsgreggZmanAve
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Comments

  • BraceMakerBraceMaker Posts: 3,212 Mega Baller
    So why does no one show the tuners?
    rockdogHorton
  • rockdogrockdog Posts: 528 Crazy Baller
    Hmm yes one of the most talked about features of the new design was talked about even more and despite the camera guy standing right next to them - just couldn’t bend his knees a little to show us.
    If someone who owns one could show us that would be appreciated!
    Horton
  • GloersenGloersen Posts: 839 Crazy Baller
  • CnewbertCnewbert Posts: 55 Baller
    Just go to nautique.com and you can find a video showing the tuners. Look for 2019 Ski Nautique Walk Through.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 26,577 Administrator
    I have made and published worse videos.

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  • igkyaigkya Posts: 580 Crazy Baller
    Was that kid from Pittsburgh... 'an that'.
  • bigskieridahobigskieridaho Posts: 915 Crazy Baller
    I shut it off after 1:00. Couldn’t listen to that guy. That is one beautiful Nautique, love the color combo for sure tho!
    Ave
  • RAWSkiRAWSki Posts: 546 Crazy Baller
    While I Totally agree with Horton. "Uhmmmm". I think that was a " Super OK" video. A great wakeboarder's review of a ski boat .
  • dbutcherdbutcher Posts: 292 Solid Baller
    From respective web sites: Ski Nautique, 2945 lbs, 98" beam
    Mastercraft Prostar, 3300 lbs, 96" beam
    Malibu Response TXI, 3100 lbs, 95" beam
    skierjp
  • HortonHorton Posts: 26,577 Administrator
    @dbutcher I am under the impression that some or all of those weight numbers are suspect.

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  • chrislandychrislandy Posts: 36 Baller
    Wow, I didn't realise the new boats were so large or heavy. My 96 205 is only 2600lb and 85in wide
  • CnewbertCnewbert Posts: 55 Baller
    I've read a lot of questions about the comparative weights of certain boats, i.e. the new Ski Nautique, the Nautique 200 and so forth in various discussion threads, as well as doubt or skepticism expressed in some instances concerning the accuracy of manufacturers' claims. Isn't this easily resolved if a few helpful owners/group members of these boats trailer them to any truck weigh station and weigh their rig with the boat and then again without the boat on the trailer to determine their actual boat's weight and report the results? For accuracy the amount of gas in the boat should be noted and any difference the truck's fuel level between weighings should be accounted for. It only costs a few bucks but would eliminate a lot of speculation and would be appreciated by many. I've read where modern digital truck scales will read accurately to +/- 5 pounds even for smaller loads. It goes without saying the boat should be emptied of all personal equipment and gear that didn't come with the boat.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 26,577 Administrator
    @Cnewbert I am not really sure why it matters. Weight is just one of many factors. All that matters is how the wakes feel and how the boat performs.

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  • skierjpskierjp Posts: 667 Crazy Baller
    @Horton, exactly!!!
  • CnewbertCnewbert Posts: 55 Baller
    If it doesn't matter then why is there so much concern about it? Seems I've read all kinds of talk of it on various threads, how much the tower adds and whether the tower is advisable because of the added weight alone, certain boats being pigs because of their weight and so forth, comparisons of boat weights one brand/model to the next, whether the new Nautique 200 weighs more than the older Ski Nautique 200 and how they compare to the new Ski Nautique etc. I'm not saying I think that it matters so much, but it seems to generate a fair amount of discussion and even criticism of certain boats. So it appears it matters a lot to some. I was just suggesting an easy and accurate way for those who may care to put the issue of how much a boat actually weighs to rest if the manufacturers' specs are not to be believed.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 26,577 Administrator
    @Cnewbert There is a lot of talk about it but I am not convinced that is it a logical way to judge a boat.

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  • CnewbertCnewbert Posts: 55 Baller
    Horton, I agree with you on that. It's only one of many factors. My suggestion would end any speculation on the accuracy of a manufacturers' specs is all.
    Tothetide
  • Ed_JohnsonEd_Johnson Posts: 1,955
    I believe what is most important for performance, is how and where the weight is distributed throughout the hull. Even small amounts of ballast distributed at different locations on the boat will effect the wake.

    Loving the new ZO Rev. S Plus Mode C3+
    Horton
  • jjackkrashjjackkrash Posts: 503 Crazy Baller
    If you can make the boat wider and a bit heavier with the same or better wake than the previous boat I suspect that might make the boat less weight sensitive, which is a good thing, IMO. Especially if you get the gas tank centered or slightly forward of center.

    But I am still curious how much all these boats really weigh.
    skierjpdvskier
  • skiinxsskiinxs Posts: 509 Crazy Baller
    @Cnewbert I doubt that weighing a single example of a model would be a good yard stick. It would be interesting to weigh a statistically significantly sample size to determine weight variance between supposedly identical models. Even more interesting would be a front/rear and right/left weight distribution analysis of identical models. I would bet there is much more variance than most people would expect. Even when fluid flow tests are consistently performed and flow rates tweaked on computerized paint robots there is significant film build variation in auto manufacturers paint booths. How much variation do you think there is when fiberglass resin and chop are hand sprayed for the entire thickness of a fiberglass layup by humans?
  • jjackkrashjjackkrash Posts: 503 Crazy Baller
    @skiinxs, so true, I worked in a glass chop shop / layup shop one summer many moons ago, and I know first hand (at least at that shop) that the hull thickness and consistency of each boat depended mostly on how hung over/still drunk the guy running the chopper gun was that day.
  • BraceMakerBraceMaker Posts: 3,212 Mega Baller
    Which boats are chop glass in the big three?

  • CnewbertCnewbert Posts: 55 Baller
    skiinxs, good point. Thanks. It didn't occur to me that there might be a significant difference in the hull weight of one boat to the next of a certain make and model. That kind of renders manufacturers' specs unreliable from the get-go I would think. I wonder how much this can actually vary? If there is a significant difference between boats of the same model and if added weight of a specific hull shape increases displacement compared to a lighter version, presumably creating a bigger wake, it makes me wonder how one can ever generalize about the wake characteristics of a given boat model as so many do. i.e., if there is concern about the added weight of a tower, or an extra person, or how full the gas tank is, etc. affecting the wake, is there enough variation in weight resulting from the imprecise hand layup process to make it impossible to make subtle comparisons between boats at all, or to really know what you are getting if you buy a boat without personally skiing behind it? Or is the variation in weight really too small to make noticeable effect? And what might be too small? +/- 50# could result on one hull differing from the next by 100#. Would an expert skier notice that difference if an added passenger is perceivable by them? I wonder if the manufacturers even know or monitor this? The more glass and resin, the higher the materials cost, so you'd think they'd pay some attention to it. Anyhow, I'm just curious about all this and I appreciate everyone's insights.
  • GolfguyGolfguy Posts: 162 Baller
    This is all good dialog and interesting perspectives as to what the boats actually weigh. The question that keeps popping up in my mind at least is: Has the steady progression upward of weight and size improved the performance of the boat and wake?
    Cnewbert
  • tjs1295tjs1295 Posts: 30 Baller
    My only concern with the width of the new boats is whether or not they will fit in my garage for winter storage. I think the width is 104 inches. My 196 fits OK, but it's a little tight. Not sure the newer boats would. That would ne a huge deal for me.
  • DWDW Posts: 1,932 Mega Baller
    @Cnewbert : Not only is there variation in boat mass primarily due to the human process' involved, there will also be performance variations across multiple molds.

    @Golfguy: increase in weight absolutely not, increase in width has helped flatten the wakes and the improvements in hull design is also a major contributor to the wake improvements over the years creating the lift to offset the mass increase. It does have some to do with water displacement, even in the dynamic state of being in motion so a heavier hull with more displacement can be offset via wetted surface area with a wider wake being the result. Another factor is the center of gravity of that mass and moving it can offer a benefit to the wake, particularly by changing the running pitch angle.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 26,577 Administrator
    @Golfguy somebody pretty smart made the comment to me yesterday that boat width is measured at the top of the gunnel. You might be surprised if you compared all four boats at the water line.

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  • Dacon62Dacon62 Posts: 617 Crazy Baller
    @tjs1295 ...boats are getting wider yes but I think (boat) trailers legal road max width is limited to 102”.
    That’s why you see the newer boats higher on the trailer sitting over the fenders and not cradled nicely between the fenders.

    Don’t boat manufacturers have meters on the resin and gel guns for consistency?
    Horton
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