Ease out of the load?

HortonHorton Posts: 24,622 Administrator
edited March 2013 in Advanced Topics
This being the first ever post in Advanced Topics I feel like this needs to be extra smart. Good luck with that. Whatever.

The one thing that had the most impact on my skiing last year was changes to my gate. One of the things I think about is something I have never heard another skier talk about.

As I approach the first wake I bring my vision and chin up to start bringing my torso up just a little bit. To get it done it is all about vision.

This is not an early edge change thing but is about easing out of the load. It seems like if I have all the load at center line, the edge change is too abrupt and I end up hard on my inside edge way too early. (Trent talks about something like this?)

Anyone think this is a bad idea? Further thoughts?


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Comments

  • MrJonesMrJones Posts: 1,693 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    Sooo many ways to skin the cat. I think the concept of "easing out" might lead some to not moving the ski out on edge. (See Seth's comments)

    My goal would be to move the ski out as powerfully as I could while maintaining control of the handle and line. If you are moving it out too aggressively to control, you might need a cue to tone you down. If you are not moving it out cleanly enough, you might need a cue to make it more powerful.

    Everybody is different. That's why you need to visit a guy like Seth, Chet, etc. at times and get some professional help.
  • Ed_JohnsonEd_Johnson Posts: 1,716
    As long as 'Looking Up" doesn't entail looking at 1 ball.....I want to focus on outbound direction first, and will even use the Centerline Wake as a little mini-ramp to help cast the ski outbound for the Reverse C.

    Looking at 1 ball to soon will cause everything to go more to the inside, causing you to be narrow and fast.
    Loving the Reflex Supershell with R Style Rear !!!
    A_B
  • bishop8950bishop8950 Posts: 946 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    @horton I have never thought about what to do with my chin but now I will try just out of curiosity!

    As far as when to ease out of the load, when I feel like I am doing it right, I ease into the load a few feet after I get my second hand on the handle - full power into the white water - starting to think about easing the load about the first wake. I should be very solid through the centerline but if I wait until then to start easing it seems too late. It seems like it should be easiest to control this at the gate because you have more time, but I do better in the course.

    This was the main thing I was working on last season and still don't have it figured out. Things I was mixing with timing of load was what Seth said about back arm pressure and something Matt Brown said about staying over your feet.

    @Sethski - ya, sometimes life is a bitch. For you, this week its not, no sympathy
  • HortonHorton Posts: 24,622 Administrator
    edited March 2013
    @Ed_Johnson
    I definitely look at the ball. I am unsure if in the long run it is bad but for the moment when I am skiing the smoothest is when I am looking at the next ball.

    @Sethski I am ashamed to say I have no idea what the heck this means.
    "keep your upper body up and out of the way of your lower body so you can move the lower body slightly ahead somewhere near the centerline in order to have the ski accelerate outbound."

    @MrJones I hear skiers talk about moving the ski out and as with Seth's comments I do not relate to it at all. I don't get it. My outbound drags the my lower body away from the center line / I do not push it out there.

    Haaa first thread of the Advanced Topics and I already look clueless. Awesome.

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    markchilcutt
  • HortonHorton Posts: 24,622 Administrator
    @matthewbrown
    what do you have to do physically to make the most efficient seemless transition from cutting edge to turning edge while maintaining the optimal path to the next buoy?

    Yes that is a better way to state what I am talking about. I am chewing on your comments.

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  • MarcusBrownMarcusBrown Posts: 137 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    I see it like this: In General Terms

    Everybody is unique. With their own idiosyncrasies, characteristics, strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, every skier is in a slightly different body position than everyone else in the world.....at any given point in the course.

    Does that change what physics??....or the rules of an efficient stance/position? Does it mean 1 person can get away with having their CG in the wrong spot, while another can't?

    I'd say no. But what it does mean, is every single skier is going to be approaching perfection on the water from a slightly different angle. Therefore the things "they" have to do, focus on, visualize, etc.... are likely going to be different.

    That is why I feel like each skier needs to develop a cognitive understanding of what an "efficient transition" looks like. The better the skiers understanding, along with a good inventory of what they currently do.....will often allow them to be their own best coach: and pin point the move(s) they need to make to maximize efficiency, and performance.

    Personally, @Horton, I think you have just scratched the surface with that hair.... a few more years = a few more lbs of wetted mass upstairs = slower transitions naturally...
    Ed_JohnsonTexas6scotchipman
  • HortonHorton Posts: 24,622 Administrator
    edited March 2013
    @matthewbrown
    I really hate reading your comments because I know I need to work on moving my center forward. In all my years of skiing I have never really worked on it. I have worked hard to get to stacked and roughly centered but further forward is all unknown to me. I watch Parrish and even Nate and they do not seem as forward as Terry or Jamie or even Greg Badal.

    I am just not sure how much I am missing by only striving to just get my hips over my front heel or however far forward I am at the wakes.

    Side note: I am working hard to bring my hips forward off the second wake.

    @MarcusBrown
    I mostly agree with what you are saying (that is if I understand what you are saying). If our body is a lever that loads the ski and the rope in a complex fashion, there is one single best method. I think you are saying that within each skiers physical limitations there is more than one way to get close their individual limit. Right?

    @Sethski
    I translate what you have said to keep power in my right arm off the second wake going to one (good reminder) and keep my junk pointed to the right of the ball. Correct?

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