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Changing Wiley Wraps

mnewthmnewth Posts: 20 Baller
This is probably the worst part of using rubber bindings... I'm changing wraps on a pair of bindings and was looking for some advice to make the task a bit easier.

Is there a video online showing the "proper" way to do it? I searched online, and on BOS and couldn't find anything to help.

Comments

  • klindyklindy Posts: 2,268 Mega Baller
    What kind of wrap? If they are the "simple" overlays you can get all the binding screwed together then pull the wraps over the binding.

    If you have longer screws and regular nuts (not the cap/castle nut) then put it together with the longer screws then after its tight, replace one screw at a time leaving the others tight in place.
    Keith Lindemulder
    AWSA Vice President
    AWSA Southern Region EVP
    skibackwardsMISkierskiinxs
  • mnewthmnewth Posts: 20 Baller
    Super Jump bindings.

    Are you saying get the sides screwed down, and then try to pull it down on the back?

    I really like the longer screw idea. I got the first one done using zip ties in 2 of the 3 holes to cinch it down tight, and then remove one at a time... so it sounds like I'm on the right track.

    Thanks @klindy
  • ktm300ktm300 Posts: 401 Baller
    Use all longer screws with open nuts. Tighten all down and use a dremel type tool with small cutting wheel to cut the extra screw length off. File them relatively smooth. Takes 1/5 the time than wrestling with the short screws and cap nuts. Also allows really tightening the horseshoes as much as you like as the screws are not limited by hitting the cap nut.
  • klindyklindy Posts: 2,268 Mega Baller
    @Horton I use longer screws and regular nuts (not acorn nuts) just to get it all assembled. The length can be an inch longer and they don't need to be stainless. Get everything assembled then, one screw at a time, replace the longer screws with the proper size. By far the hardest thing to do is to get all the parts squeezed tight enough to get the first thread to catch on the first couple screws. Horton uses vice grips. I've never used them.
    Keith Lindemulder
    AWSA Vice President
    AWSA Southern Region EVP
    Horton
  • HortonHorton Posts: 27,397 Administrator
    edited January 2017
    @klindy
    More than one way to skin a cat. When I was a jumper I don't think I was aware that there was such a thing as a nut and bolt store so I learned my method based on what I had available. (Late 1980s -early 1990s)

    Support BallOfSpray by supporting the companies that support BallOfSpray

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    klindy
  • MISkierMISkier Posts: 2,531 Mega Baller
    Some great techniques and suggestions here. I've only ever done it with the original screws, cap nuts, and no vice grips. Took a very long time with a lot of swearing. Only benefit was a huge increase in my own grip strength from wrestling with that overlay, stretching it around the heel piece, and trying to clamp it under the horseshoes with my fingers.
    The worst slalom equipment I own is between my ears.
    dchristman
  • Mike GileMike Gile Posts: 307 Crazy Baller
    Assemble front horseshoe first with overlays in place. Put screws through heel and loosely attach back two screws so there is play in the rear horseshoe.

    I recommend sitting in a chair for the next part and maybe getting started with an IPA at this point. With the assembled rubber facing away from you place the front of the plate on the chair between your legs. Beware as this can scratch the chair, its best if there is some grip to the chair. One hand on the heel rubber, take the other and grab a wrap. Pull tight over the front toe rubber and hold with the hand on the heel rubber. Grab the other wrap and place it over the first wrap. This will hold the first wrap in place.

    Continue to pull on the second wrap and tuck it under the heel horseshoe. You can do this with vice grips if you need. Hold pressure on the heel horseshoe to hold in place.

    Go back the the first wrap and copy move above, wrapping the heel and tucking under the heel hardware. You can make a few adjustments at this point if the wraps don't look right or the lengths are not even. Tighten the heel hardware. If you have the wraps with the holes you don't need to go through the holes if you have a drill rather than a screwdriver.

    Drink the rest of the IPAs.
  • DirtDirt Posts: 1,589 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    The easiest way:

    Buy a new binding.

    Plan B:

    1. Remove binding from jumper.

    2. Struggle with it and complain about it on the dock.

    3. Pro jumper Brian Kinney gets tired of watching you make an ass of yourself and does it for you.

    4. Thank Brian.
    I learned everything I know not to do from Horton
    Mateo_VargasThan_Bogan
  • HortonHorton Posts: 27,397 Administrator
    edited January 2017
    @Dirt there is no beer involved in your solution?

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    MasterCraft ★ Masterline ★ MOB ★ Performance Ski and Surf ★ Reflex ★ Radar ★ Stokes

  • RichardDoaneRichardDoane Posts: 4,062 Mega Baller
    @mnewth - smart guy ships them back to Wiley's for Robert to rebuild and then return
    BallOfSpray Pacific Northwest Vice President of Event Management, aka "Zappy"
    The_MSjetpilotg4
  • thompjsthompjs Posts: 537 Solid Baller
    I used longer screws with SS nylock nuts. Put nut on upside down and cut off excess and grind off any burr.

    But Richard Doane may have the easiest. Shipping might cost as much as new one anyway.
    MISkier
  • sunvalleylawsunvalleylaw Posts: 1,259 Mega Baller
    edited January 2017
    So not to highjack the thread, but it appears to me the same ideas could work on D3 Leverage bindings. Seems more efficient to ask the question here rather than post a new thread. If the procedure is different, I can start a new thread. Can anyone with experience with the bindings agree or disagree that the above ideas would apply to the D3 bindings?
  • HortonHorton Posts: 27,397 Administrator
    edited January 2017
    D3 stuff should be 1,000,000,000 percent easier. Not the save challenge or problem.

    Support BallOfSpray by supporting the companies that support BallOfSpray

    Barts ★ Connelly ★  DBSkis ★ Goode ★ Hobe Lake ★ HO Syndicate 

    MasterCraft ★ Masterline ★ MOB ★ Performance Ski and Surf ★ Reflex ★ Radar ★ Stokes

  • ColeGiacopuzziColeGiacopuzzi Posts: 419 Open or 55K Rated Skier
    When I first switched to Wileys, I definitely tightened the bindings the HARD WAY when I first got them, until I heard about @Horton soap trick from @charlieskiwest.
  • MISkierMISkier Posts: 2,531 Mega Baller
    edited May 2017
    I just had to change my heel rubber on my Wiley front binding. I used the method @klindy described:

    "If you have longer screws and regular nuts (not the cap/castle nut) then put it together with the longer screws then after its tight, replace one screw at a time leaving the others tight in place. "

    I bought 1 1/2 inch #8 screws and nuts. I didn't use anything else but that and screwdrivers (manual and drill driver). I didn't time myself, but I was probably done in about 15 minutes and definitely less than 20 - including removing and replacing the binding on the ski. Easiest binding repair ever. BOS does it again.
    The worst slalom equipment I own is between my ears.
    klindy
  • skiinxsskiinxs Posts: 533 Crazy Baller
    I like the longer screw idea, why didn't I think of that? May not be necessary with the longer screws, but several pair of small needle nose vice grips helps a lot.
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