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Need a trick ski RTP, anyone have one?

303Skier303Skier Posts: 468 Solid Baller
edited May 2018 in Trick and Jump
Can anyone tell me what I have here? Is it worth slapping boots on? I’m a slalom guy and know nothing about trick skis but was considering getting into it as a time killer on the lake. Something to mess around with when I’m bored.



Jarrus Steele - Orlando, Florida

Comments

  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,872 Infinite Pandas
    Absolutely go for it and enjoy it. Buy the new ski when you get there. Play on that one for now.

    Eric
    MuskokaKyandjules
  • MarkTimmMarkTimm Posts: 100 Baller
    It's a Kidder Trick with Mastercraft graphics.
    Mark Timm
    303Skierandjules
  • 303Skier303Skier Posts: 468 Solid Baller
    @eleeski @markTimm @ everyone

    Is this a good trick ski? I am 6'3" ~200 and it's a 43", will it work?

    Also I need a rear loop, what are my options and how do I know how to mount it without holes as a guide?
    Jarrus Steele - Orlando, Florida
  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,872 Infinite Pandas
    The ski is a reasonable ski that will work for you. You'd learn a bit faster on a bigger modern ski but in its day, that ski was sized for you.

    A toe kicker should be at a 45 degree angle pretty close to the front foot. We used to get as close as possible but now I'm 3cm (an inch) wider. It's still pretty tight. Start with a loose strap that is easy to get in. I use a strap about 7cm wide (2inches) of binding rubber. I have used thorn proof bicycle innertubes if I didn't have binding rubber. Test the fit with a mount on scrap plywood and transfer your favorite to the ski.

    Or you can buy a factory toe kicker assembly. Buy it oversized so it is easy to kick in and comfortable.

    When you get to ski line tricks and flips - well, you will be on a new ski. Worry about heel straps and binding fit then. Until then, enjoy!

    Eric
    303Skier
  • Bruce_ButterfieldBruce_Butterfield Posts: 1,522 Mega Baller
    You can get a good toe plate here:
    d3skis.com/product-p/leverage-ptp.htm

    That ski will be good to get started, but if you start liking tricks you will learn faster on a 44" Quantum or D3. If you can find a 45", that's even better.
    I'm Ancient. WTH do I know?
    303Skier
  • 303Skier303Skier Posts: 468 Solid Baller
    @Bruce_Butterfield WHat makes the other more modern skis easier?
    Jarrus Steele - Orlando, Florida
  • Bruce_ButterfieldBruce_Butterfield Posts: 1,522 Mega Baller
    @303Skier the biggest thing is getting more surface area. You are marginal to really learn tricks on a 43, but fine if you are just messing around.

    Getting a 44 or 45” ski will be easier to ride and progress faster if you do decide to take it more seriously.

    The newer skis are just a tad wider at a given length (again more surface area) and almost all have gone to hard edges vs the old rubber edge. Lots of reasons and different opinions on rubber vs hard edge, but I think hard edge is better all around.

    There has also been a lot of general progress in trick ski design over the last 30 years the same as slalom. If some is just trying slalom, a 30 yr old ski is fine, but once they get past the basics, progress will be much faster on a modern ski. Same story with trick skis.

    It’s easy enough to get a toe plate and play around for awhile to see if you like it before going wild.
    I'm Ancient. WTH do I know?
    303Skiereleeski
  • gordgord Posts: 7 Baller
    I would love to get my hands on that trick ski, if you would like to get rid of it.
    705 three45 565six
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