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Coming out of turn on back foot

mbabiashmbabiash Posts: 561 Crazy Baller
I’m really struggling with coming out of turn on the back foot. Are there any tips to preventing this? I’ve tried standing tall coming into turn but tend to fall back. I’ll try to post video.
BlueSki

Comments

  • ski6jonesski6jones Posts: 1,075 Mega Baller
    A coach once asked me what moves first to initiate the turn? His answer was your front foot, specifically the front foot initiating the edge in the turn. That comment helped me a lot. Don't remember what I said but it was not that.
    Carl Addington, Lakes of Katy, Texas
    Killerthager
  • ballsohardballsohard Posts: 298 Solid Baller
    I totally understand that description @Than_Bogan I'm gonna try to implement that thought process in my skiing!
  • Deep11Deep11 Posts: 221 Solid Baller
    Damn @Than_Bogan - I’ve literally just worked that out and was trying to find the words. The explanation for WHY it works of course could take a whole lot longer. Also why it’s more relevant with your onside rather than offside ????
  • WishWish Posts: 8,054 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    Deep11. If your ahead of the ski your placing your weight on the largest portion of the ski, less drag, more lift, faster through the turn so the ski catches up with you when your connecting back up with the boat. Then there's the opposite. Hoping to get better at it.
    >>> 11.25..a different kettle of fish. <<<
    Skierxthager
  • gregygregy Posts: 2,583 Mega Baller
    I agree with what Than is saying but I've found that ski setup has something to do with it as well. For me I have problems with a ski takes excessive front foot pressure to get the ski to come around properly or a ski that is too sensitive. With the a ski setup that requires a lot front foot pressure I tend to get a rebound effect where I fall back or the ski doesn't finish and I end up back on the ski and going straight at the next buoy. If the ski is too sensitive then I tend to be cautious by bending my knees too much coming into the turn (mostly offside) and end up with my hips behind coming out of turn.
  • vernonreevevernonreeve Posts: 94 Baller
    I moved my bindings forward a notch and that helped when I was having that issue.
    ballsohard
  • Deep11Deep11 Posts: 221 Solid Baller
    Thanks @Wish - for me the process @Than_Bogan is talking about seems to work better when there is also using a conscious “unweighting” rather than simply riding round the turn with front foot pressure. (That obviously works but seems to result in a wider radius turn and earlier load for me. It can also result in what @gregy commented on)
  • LeonLLeonL Posts: 2,386 Crazy Baller
    In some situation the answer is much simpler than that. Sometimes I'm just skiing into a slightly loose line. I try to connect at the end of the turn. And there's not much there, I lean and go back.
    Leon Leonard Stillwater Lake KY - SR Driver SR Judge
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 2,747 Mega Baller
    @Than_Bogan “Lead with your face.”
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
    Than_Boganballsohard
  • John BrooksJohn Brooks Posts: 367 Crazy Baller
    I was thinking more leading with your hips.
    ScottScottballsohard
  • BraceMakerBraceMaker Posts: 4,368 Mega Baller
    @gregy definitely with you there - when I was first trying to set up my own skis I kept making them not come around very well - then I'd end up really coming out back foot heavy to finish the ski around. Even with factory fins I like the conversation that's going on these days.
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