One Legged Skier

RBRB Posts: 67 Baller
edited September 2010 in Technique & Theory
<p>
Hello all,
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<p>
 Longtime lurker, new poster. 
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<p>
 My current ski driver/ski partner has one leg: His right. Nothing below the knee on the left, nor even a left thigh muscle.
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<p>
 We've been skiing together only this summer. At first he was reluctant to attempt the course, however, after one time he's now hooked. He can make cuts on both sides with confidence.
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<p>
My reason for posting is, any and all advice from those who have skied with or coached one legged skiers is requested. 
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<p>
Clearly there are some balance issues that cannot be overcome. We are making progress, he's at 1 1/2 balls at 15 off, 28 mph. He's dieing to make 2 ball, his <em>really</em> off side.
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<p>
I've been trying to figure out how to help his overall weight distribution problem and was wondering if you think it makes sense to add some weight to where the back foot would normally be? Or just keep at it from a technique perspective.
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Comments

  • skibugskibug Posts: 2,029
    I believe Seth Stisher has skied with and coached a one legged skier.  You may want to contact him at H2Osmosis.
    Bob Grizzi
  • Than_BoganThan_Bogan Posts: 6,359 Mega Baller
    <p>
    To be clear: I have NO actual experience related to this.
    </p>
    <p>
    But I would *think* you'd want to move the binding closer to the middle of where the two bindings would have been.  To me that would make a lot more sense than adding weight to the ski, since that would presumably also make it harder to turn.
    </p>
    <p>
    But anyhow, there should be some folks who have done this and run a lot of buoys, so finding them seems to be your best bet.  I know USA Waterski has a formal disabled division.
    </p>
    Nathaniel Bogan -- GUT Padawan
  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,819 Infinite Pandas
    <p>
    Are prosthetics an option?
    </p>
    <p>
    Don Priest in central CA is a double amputee, talented skier and I heard he was in the prosthetic design and manufacturing business. It's been a long time since I've seen him but he might be a good contact.
    </p>
    <p>
    I would not add weight to the ski. Move the bindings - huge amounts - to change the balance. Try a shorter ski, hardshells lots of stuff. OK even weights - that might be easiest but be sure the bouyancy is considered.
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    <p>
    I trick on one foot a lot. Powerful edges both ways are possible one footed. Keep working at it!
    </p>
    <p>
    Eric
    </p>
  • h2odawg79h2odawg79 Posts: 599 Baller
    <p>
    Ya, contact Seth he will help you out.
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    <p>
    Very Cool, Tell your partner WAY TO GO! I wish him the very Best in this sport. His desire and determination is very inspirational and I hope y'all will be surrounded by some of the Best freinds that Slalom has to offer...
    </p>
    HOO HAW! thankya very much
  • CraigCraig Posts: 111 Baller
    edited September 2010
    <p>
    I remember seeing some video of a one-legged skier awhile back, and perhaps even an article in WS magazine.
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    <p>
    IIRC, in the article the guy mentioned doing exactly what Than mentions, moving the single binding a bit closer to the center of the ski.
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    <p>
    That said, I looked around on Youtube and could only find this guy, he looks like he is on a phophecy, but it is hard to tell where the boot is.
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    <p>
    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U29JnT0CY0s" target="_blank"> One leg skiing </a>.
    </p>
    <p>
     Running 22off @36 with one leg gets a hats off from me!!
    </p>
  • Than_BoganThan_Bogan Posts: 6,359 Mega Baller
    <p>
    Wow!!!
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    <p>
    Two hats off would be deserved if only I had two heads.
    </p>
    Nathaniel Bogan -- GUT Padawan
  • RBRB Posts: 67 Baller
    <p>
    Thanks everyone.
    </p>
    <p>
    Didn't really want to add weight, just occurred to me last night that it might help.
    </p>
    <p>
    Moving the binding is the obvious solution, too funny because I always move mine, never thought about moving his.
    </p>
  • davemacdavemac Posts: 450 Baller
    edited September 2010
    --Seth's buddy's name is Scott Reardon. Video of him skiing is on the following page (or available on youtube)... www.h2osmosis.com/spip.php?page=videos . Also, I'm cutting and pasting the following post from a thread on themalibucrew from a MT skier with first hand experience (his original post included a picture of him ripping it up).....

    "Love this thread and I just have to comment about the back foot issue. I have had the <radar> Theory for two seasons now and absolutely love it. I took the back binding off completely and moved the front boot back two two holes and then adjusted the fin and stabilizer so that the tip rode just a bit higher in the water and so that I could initiate my turns more aggressively. Oh, I forgot to mention that I only have one leg. So the point is that you really don't even need weight on your back foot to ski well. Just a well balanced stance with your hips forward on initiation. However, I would not recommend this binding set up for anyone who does have two good legs. Just leave it at factory specs. I do get pretty tired after two sets but that is just me.
    Since I am skiing behind a v drive I tend to ski at 32mph with the rope at 60' but these things are relative to your wake and boat load which can vary on any given day. Just find the sweet spot in the wake and it gives you one less thing to worry about as you rip across it. Crossing a double dip wake can add to fatigue and increase your chances of doing what my son calls the starfish spin.'
  • Jody_SealJody_Seal Posts: 2,633 Mega Baller
    <p>
    A number of years ago I met a young Australian name Steve. Steve did all three events with a foot amputation just above the ankle. Worked with him a bit when he tried to put his prostethic foot and lower leg in a binding and ski with both feet. This he tried for a few years but he eventully went back to just one foot. This was before speed control Steve could run into 32 at 36 mph(maybe better) trick 3000 plus and jump over 100'.
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    <p>
    I ran into Steve at the Moomba this year He is considering getting back into tournament skiing as he now has a family he would like to bring into the sport. He is now old enough to ski at 34 mph and is looking forward to attempt 35 off.
    </p>
    <p>
     After watching Scott in the video I will do my best to never whine about ZO Again!!! Or any other ski related problem!
    </p>
    Hobby Boats can be expensive when the hobbyist is limited on their own skill and expertise.


  • DWDW Posts: 1,973 Mega Baller
    <p>
    First, kudo's to helping your friend.  There was a video clip of a European skier amputee (one leg) which was very impressive.  If you can't dig it up, I would imagine Schnitz would be forthcoming with contact information on the gentleman.  There might also be some good contacts in the snow ski arena. 
    </p>
    <p>
    There is a snowmobile racer, the name escapes me right now, that fabricated his own mechanical leg to handle the requirements of snowmobile racing.  He was an amputee at the hip, so pretty severe.  It intriqued me because I thought of the very element you are trying to solve.  It uses geometry and a spring / shock combination to achieve the proper dynamics, damping and spring rate for the knee articulation.  Not sure any application here because it sounds like going solo is a good solution.
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  • auskierauskier Posts: 453 Baller
    <p>
    I have the video somewhere of a european guy running into 35, i believe it was the one on schnitz's site. Will try and look for it.
    </p>
    <p>
    Scott is not skiing much these days. He was awarded a position at the AIS (Australian Institute of Sport) and has the goal of representing Australia at the London Olympics for running.
    </p>
    Toby
  • RBRB Posts: 67 Baller
    <p>
    DW
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    <p>
    We were going to try and fabricate some sort of shock/damping device to use with his spare leg....
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    <p>
    ....until I saw these videos, amazing.
    </p>
  • DragoDrago Posts: 1,488 Mega Baller
    I've had some experience with two amputees in the past. One used a prosthesis, the other didn't. We moved the binding back.There were no hard-shells back then, but I would think a stiffer hard-shell in a slightly more upright position would really help the fore-aft balance. I would also want a release on my one good leg...!
    SR SL Judge & Driver (“a driver who is super late on the wheel and is out of sync”)
  • well i am a one leg skier, i've skied deep 28, can land a flip, and jump over 70 feet.
    if you want any infomation email me at [email protected]

    scott
  • RichardDoaneRichardDoane Posts: 4,059 Mega Baller
    Scott - welcome to the BOS forum, where do you ski ?
    BallOfSpray Pacific Northwest Vice President of Event Management, aka "Zappy"
  • Chuck_DickeyChuck_Dickey Posts: 1,459 Crazy Baller
    <p>
    an Argentinian named Leo skiing shortline with one leg. Amazing balance!
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    <p>
     
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    <div>
    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ2zGZYsqFI" target="_new"><font color="#0033cc">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ2zGZYsqFI</font></a>
    </div>
  • AndreAndre Posts: 1,184 Crazy Baller
    <p>
    Thanks guys!
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    <p>
    Now ,i feel like the one with the handicap skiing crap on 2 good legs :)
    </p>
  • Stevie BoyStevie Boy Posts: 1,919 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    Only one word comes to mind for your ski buddy  RESPECT!

    "Getting Harder/Getting Positive”

  • rbuchrbuch Posts: 2
    I have my Binding 70 mm behind the Goode default position.
    Skiing on one leg with a sort of reflex hardshell.
    The position of a friend of mine is 110 mm behind Goode default, one legged.
  • RBRB Posts: 67 Baller
    <p>
    Thanks all.
    </p>
    <p>
     We are currently searching ski it again for a new ski for him.
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    <p>
    Any suggestions?
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    <p>
    6' 3" - 190#
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  • DWDW Posts: 1,973 Mega Baller
    <p>
    In my opinion, ski choice is very personal and differs for each person.  I would, however, think that a ski that has a large sweet spot would be a good direction to go.  I would also suggest perhaps contacting a few companies directly to get their recommendations.  I am sure you will get very positive feedback from several of the companies, as a few actually post construtive feedback on this forum. 
    </p>
    <p>
    From my experience, I have felt that D3 skis are very easy to ride and I would think it might be a good choice. I would certainly demo several options.
    </p>

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