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AdHoc weight training - good or bad

swbcaswbca Posts: 126 Baller
edited December 2020 in Technique & Theory
Starting over with competitive slalom in Men9 next spring - last tournament 1985 nationals in Men3 and have only free skied once every 5 years. That's a 35 year gap. Everything I have done since then does nothing for upper body; bike, ski, roller blade.

We have a weight machine and I have a full time desk job at home . . so I have been doing a set of Pull Downs on the machine every time I need a break from my desk - hoping to work up to pull ups. Been doing about 20 sets per day of 12 or 18 (multiples of a perfect passes) a day for 2 months. The weight I can do has advanced 50% since I started.

This all day approach of quick sessions is not a prescribed method that I have seen for resistance training. It suits my short attention span gives and me a 5 minute break from my desk several times a day. Is it counterproductive for strength and conditioning ? I know there are better ways but can this be "bad" in some way ? There are also other conditioning things I do on a more traditional schedule.
drewBongo

Comments

  • StefanStefan Posts: 127 Baller
    @swbca if you have advanced 50% in weights this way it can't be bad..
    swbcagsm_peter
  • LakeboyWWKLakeboyWWK Posts: 25 Baller
    @swbca The method you are using is similar to a method used by strength athletes that was originally studied in the soviet union in the 1980's. Short intense sets of 3-5 reps with long rest intervals in between sets will increase your strength, without adding much bulk (muscle hypertrophy). The goal should be to increase your strength to weight ratio. You can learn more about this "greasing the groove" method by reading articles by Pavel Tsatsouline at strongfirst.com
    swbca
  • swbcaswbca Posts: 126 Baller
    @LakeboyWWK @lpskier lot of good information, thanks.
    -
    Regarding leg strength, I have been studying the pro-tournaments on youtube. All of the men ski with their forward knee bent almost 90 degrees except late in the preturn and when reaching out over the buoy on very short line turns. I think that's fairly new in slalom technique. Older videos of the pros didn't do that so much and I recall attempting to use the legs like that only in rough water back when I was on top of my divisions.

    Leg strength has to be VERY good to handle the loads in a near squat leg position. I don't understand what it does - any comment ?

  • StefanStefan Posts: 127 Baller
    @swbca not everyone bend a lot, look at Adam Caldwell here, World Record in +35y 34mph with 1,[email protected];
    OldkierswbcaS1PittsMichaelWiebe
  • swbcaswbca Posts: 126 Baller
    edited December 2020
    You're right he is a pretty straight up skier . . I think there is a teenager that skis like that in the top 10 of all the pros - - cant remember his name - - still wonder why so many ski with a deep knee.
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,076 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    @Stefan @adamhcaldwell What a chicken. He didn’t two hand six ball at 41. He does noticeably start his edge change before the first wake, particularly on the 135 side. What a great skier.
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
  • skiboynyskiboyny Posts: 260 Baller
    Are you currently skiing?
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,076 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    @skiboyny Who?
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
  • skiboynyskiboyny Posts: 260 Baller
    @lpskier sorry question was for @swbca
  • swbcaswbca Posts: 126 Baller
    edited December 2020
    @lpskier After a 35 year gap, I am starting over in Men9 at 75 years old. It may be a pipe dream, but I am hoping to catch up with my friends from way back who are still skiing and placing in the nationals in Men 7,8,9. I am healthy and active but have no idea how long it takes to rebuild SKILLS after so many years. SKILL recovery is the biggest unknown. I have never stopped "visualizing" the experience, but that's different than muscle memory.

    A QUESTION If its convenient to do certain weight training that involves 50 lifts at a light weight, what does that do that do is different than doing 10 lifts at a heavy weight. I just started learning to workout with a kettlebell which feels great after a few days. I live in two places and I have to have something portable at our second home. The kettlebell is light for some traditional weight train moves, but if 50 lifts does something for my strength, the kettlebell is a convenient item to have at both homes.
  • JoepruncJoeprunc Posts: 308 Baller
    I can't comment on the heavy short # of reps vs light and large # reps. But I've heard kettlebells are great to work multiple muscles at the same time.

    If kettlebells are your go to, you might want to look at getting a set of adjustable KBs. Small foot print and easy enough to have at both houses.
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,076 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    I think that as a general rule, multiple reps of a light weight is good for fitness and a few reps of a heavy weight builds muscle. So if you want to get in shape, do the former; if you want to get stronger, do the latter. @bkreis is a fitness coach and might add a lot to this conversation. I can tell you that Brian can create a program for you using a minimal amount of gear, and I can tell you that he knows his stuff.
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
    Oldkier
  • LakeboyWWKLakeboyWWK Posts: 25 Baller
    @swbca as a general rule sets with rep ranges 1-5 will build strength, 6-12 will build muscle size, reps of 13 and greater will build muscle endurance. There is some overlap ie: sets in the 6-12 will also build strength but primarily muscle size. It worth doing sets in all ranges, but if you have a specific goal such as strength to weight ratio, it's most effective to stay in the 1-5 range.
    swbca
  • skiboynyskiboyny Posts: 260 Baller
    edited December 2020
    @swbca I think it's great you giving skiing another kick in the pants. You have a pretty lofty goal and that's great as well. A word of caution, recovery is your biggest stumbling block at your age. A lot has changed in 35 years and although your mind is ready for the challenge your body will have other ideas. You need to be patient with yourself, if you head straight out to the course and do multiple passes days in a row I fear your dream will be short lived. Absolutely do a strength program, with a emphasis on core strength. I would suggest keeping the reps on the high side at first 10-12 using a weight you can handle in good form until your body gets used to the workload. When you can complete 12 increase the weight. Give yourself 2 days before you workout again. Your muscles grow when they rest and recover and as I said recovery is the greatest hurdle. Listen carefully to your body and give it the time and space you need to return to competitive skiing. Push to hard and to fast and your comeback will be short lived. Best of luck.
    OldkierswbcaDaveD
  • BG1BG1 Posts: 207 Baller
    @swbca I have no ties what so ever with FPM but I think you should invest in their program if you’re really serious about working your way back to the podium.

    https://www.flowpointmethod.com/the-program
  • MichaelGoodmanMichaelGoodman Posts: 184 Baller
    This type of thing really is interesting to me I know I took ten years off from playing
    hockey and it was brutal to get back in hockey shape. That was 30 years ago and have never gone more than 3 weeks since without playing until corona shut it down. Hope it is not to hard to get started again. I always thought it was incredible that when Lance Armstrong got out of the hospital he could barley ride his bike 1/4 of a mile and he went from basically zero to winning so many Tour de Frances muscle memory must be a super
    strong thing. I hope you keep us posted I look forward to see how you do. Good Luck
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