Ski to suit ability vs Ski for high end performance

jenksskijenksski Posts: 49 Baller
Guys,

I've heard experienced high level skiers online talk about, 'Try to ski on the highest end ski you can afford, not to suit ski ability level'.

With only a few years experience myself, I've always thought it's best to ski on a ski to suit ability level.
A little more width and weight on a ski will give you more stability and control if your technique isn't quite up to scratch. Right or Wrong!???

Be great to hear everyone's thought's.

Thanks in advanced.
Tagged:
gsm_peter

Comments

  • YoKoYoKo Posts: 4 New Baller
    @jenksski
    I hope you don't mind me jumping on your thread, but it is so relevant to my situation.
    I started skiing last spring and got absolutely hooked.
    My coach helped me choose my first ski and it is a 69" Radar Union 2020 which I love and enjoy a lot.
    Yesterday the deal of the century came up on one of the FB for sale pages in the UK.
    For sale was a 67" 2020 Radar Vapour Graphite brand new, never used, never fitted with bindings for 1/3 of the selling price. That was an opportunity I could not afford to miss.
    Thank you, John from Salisbury! It was a pleasure meeting you.

    Now I am a bit confused what to do.
    Should I sell my Union and jump straight on the Vapour or leave it until next year?
    I am skiing 15 off, 26pmh and I can't finish a course yet.
    My hope is there will be no covid lockdowns this season and if I keep being consistent by the end of the summer I should be closer to a level of skiing to enjoy the Vapour.
    What do you guys think?
    2ValveFastguy888
  • ralral Posts: 1,925 Mega Baller
    edited March 19
    When learning the course at long line and slower speeds, a shorter high end ski is not only a waste of money, but also will make progress far more difficult.

    Take a look at the ski size in the pic, which she used until she was running consistently 28 MPH.

    Store the wing as well...


    Rodrigo Andai
    aupatkingDaveD
  • gsm_petergsm_peter Posts: 828 Crazy Baller
    @yoko
    My 2 cents being just an intermediate skier (PB Training, 4 boies 52kmh/32mph at yes 25off/15m. Ride a Senate)

    I think you will develop faster on a more forgiving ski until you have a more solid position. I believe shall grow out of a ski until the skier is stacked. Then it is time to ride a high end ski. My guess is that the beneficial level for a shift is beyond 15/22 of at 32/52 kmh.
    The Union is a great ski and it can take you a long way.

    BTW. My friend tested the Radar Theory (type earlier version of the Union) and did tun a full 38 off 34 mph pass on the ski without problem.
    Life is too short not to enjoy every day!
  • blakeyatesblakeyates Posts: 191 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    A very good choice would be the HO Syndicate Omni or Carbon Omni; Carbon version is less expensive. My skiing partner is 67 years old and ski's with a front prosthetic (below the knee) and he got back to running the course after a 15 year lay-off and he loves the Carbon Omni. It's wider, stable, but turns very good. I began my season 2 years ago on it and I liked it to the point that I had a hard time coming off of it to go to my higher end ski.
    Blake Yates
    Nautique Promo Rep, GA
    Clydesdale
  • ALPJrALPJr Posts: 2,651 Mega Baller
    Many of the ski manufacturers offer skis designed to fit the skier’s skills and the goals they are working towards. Connelly, D3, HO, and Radar offer skis for all levels. Lots of retail dealers have deals on leftover skis from the past few years. Performance Ski and Surf aka @perfski has a very knowledgeable and helpful staff, and recently listed great deals on close out ski and binding packages. You may want to give them a call or shoot them an email for advice.
  • JmoskiJmoski Posts: 409 Solid Baller
    Try the vapor out and see how you feel on it, but keep your union until your sure about the change. I agree with the comments about the speed your running matters. I think pro’s just assume your running 34/36mph...

    I switched off from a vapor to the senate as I ski 30/32mph in the course, and at those speeds the senate is more stable and a lot less work to turn it.

    Technique and body position are far more important than having a high end ski. Due to my own limitations, I figure currently I am only getting 40% out of the senate in terms of what it’s capable of, the vapor I bet that number is even lower for me!
    aupatkingYoKo
  • floridagmfloridagm Posts: 49 Baller
    edited March 19
    How timely!

    Coming off a 69 Senate Pro Build that was working for me but had, shall we say, an unfortunate incident. Expanding the search, I am demoing a 69 Omni at the moment and struggling with it. Is the ski capable of running 30 buoys more than I can? Of course it is. Am I possibly accustomed to a “faster” ski that lets me get away with stuff I shouldn’t be able to? Possibly. Solution? A demo Omega arrived as I’m typing this (props to HO) and hopefully I’ll have my answer by Monday.
    TEL
  • Fastguy888Fastguy888 Posts: 96 Baller
    I have never bought the "Advanced" "Expert" "Pro" version of sporting equipment and ever had buyers remorse. I do regret buying my Radar Senate vs a Vapor. I skied on a 1995 Connelly Revolution SPeed Base in College, took 21 years off. Got back into it and took advice from others and bought a new 2020 Rader Senate Graphite 69" I'm 6'2" 220lbs fit. I have huge buyers remorse. Not a bad ski at all, but for the same price could have got a Radar Vapor. Probably a combination of lack of skill and changes in technology the ski feels way too soft. I am going to keep skiing on it and try to adapt; Im sure the ski could out perform me, but would would rather be adapting to a "too advance" ski. I am already getting through the course again and feel the ski is to big and soft.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 31,528 Administrator
    @YoKo I have had great luck with skiers at your level on the Vapor. It is one of those skis that is both a legit very short line skis and very good for long lines and slower speeds.

    Support BallOfSpray by supporting the companies that support BallOfSpray

    Connelly ★ DBSkis ★ Denali ★ Follow ★ Goode ★ GiveGo ★ HO Syndicate ★ MasterCraft

    Masterline ★ Performance Ski and Surf★ Reflex★ Radar★ Rodics OffCourse ★ Stokes

     

    KimbymonBooYoKo
  • HortonHorton Posts: 31,528 Administrator
    @Fastguy888 The Senate is a very good ski and at your size might be the best choice. On the other hand you purchased a lower spec Senate. Nothing wrong with the Graphite but if you have higher expectations you want a Lithium or ProBuild. With these skis the material spec makes a huge difference. If you are unhappy with a Graphite Senate you would likely be just as unhappy with a Graphite Vapor. Move up to a Lithium in either shape and you will be much happier.

    Support BallOfSpray by supporting the companies that support BallOfSpray

    Connelly ★ DBSkis ★ Denali ★ Follow ★ Goode ★ GiveGo ★ HO Syndicate ★ MasterCraft

    Masterline ★ Performance Ski and Surf★ Reflex★ Radar★ Rodics OffCourse ★ Stokes

     

    Fastguy888customski
  • Fastguy888Fastguy888 Posts: 96 Baller
    Good input @Horton buying a ski today is like dating; you can go out with one of the Smith Girls but if you are going out with Cindy Smith (Graphite Senate ) you may have a whole different experience than with her sister Mary Smith (Pro Build Senate ). * Fictitious sisters, I am not referencing any real Smith's My Radar Senate Graphite is a great ski, just not used to the relatively slower flex rebound response; especial coming off a virtually no flex 1990's stick. If I would have taken others or Radar's advice more precisely and got a Pro Build, would probably be a perfect ski for me. No fault of Radar or the ski, but hopefully others can take note of how different the material and/or core version make. Just like Miss Smith, I think it best to take it out on a test whenever possible before you marry her.
  • HortonHorton Posts: 31,528 Administrator
    It is worth noting that most modern skis are not super stiff but the materials make them go faster with less effort.

    Support BallOfSpray by supporting the companies that support BallOfSpray

    Connelly ★ DBSkis ★ Denali ★ Follow ★ Goode ★ GiveGo ★ HO Syndicate ★ MasterCraft

    Masterline ★ Performance Ski and Surf★ Reflex★ Radar★ Rodics OffCourse ★ Stokes

     

    Fastguy888skialex
  • floridagmfloridagm Posts: 49 Baller
    (Coming off a 69 Senate Pro Build that was working for me but had, shall we say, an unfortunate incident. Expanding the search, I am demoing a 69 Omni at the moment and struggling with it. Is the ski capable of running 30 buoys more than I can? Of course it is. Am I possibly accustomed to a “faster” ski that lets me get away with stuff I shouldn’t be able to? Possibly. Solution? A demo Omega arrived as I’m typing this (props to HO) and hopefully I’ll have my answer by Monday.)

    Update.

    If there was ever a poster child for a wider ski, it’s me. I’m 240lbs, ski at 29mph, have successfully made a few passes at 15 off. Got a set on the 68 Omega this morning and immediately knew it was the better choice. It felt just as forgiving of my mistakes, yet in my seconds of competency, acted like a high level ski. It was much faster across the course and made my crappy offside turn like it knew what I was supposed to be doing. It never hunted for an edge yet turned like a knife with just a little more correct body positioning. Spend the money. Buy once, cry once.
    TELYoKo
  • jenksskijenksski Posts: 49 Baller
    @YoKo No worries. Good to hear peoples experiences etc.

    Thanks for everyone's opinions, with the high end vs mid range ski choice.
    From what I've taken from people's comments, it's worth to demo a few skis before buying I reckon.

    Than_BoganYoKo
Sign In or Register to comment.