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coaching kids - what is important

HortonHorton Posts: 29,127 Administrator
edited January 2008 in Technique & Theory
<p class="MsoNormal">
<font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000">When I coach kids I am always unsure if they should ski the same way I do. I weigh 190 and am relatively strong. Should I try to teach a 90 pound G2 skier to do the same things that I think are important for my skiing? Do you guys think that there are things that you just ignore until a skier is heavier & stronger?</font>
</p>
<font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000"> </font><span style="font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman'"><font color="#000000">As an example: for my own skiing, I firmly believe that I need to be as centered on the ski as possible at the wakes. If I drag my butt at the wakes then nothing else is going to work. A lot of young skiers chase balls with their hips back. </font></span>

 

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Comments

  • Chuck_DickeyChuck_Dickey Posts: 1,462 Crazy Baller
    <p>
    No, I think all the fundamentals are the same and bad habits are hard to break.
    </p>
    <p>
    I am having a hard time getting Pinky to stop sitting on the tail of her ski as she is rounding the balls. Turns are huge as the tip of her ski is high and she get later at every ball.  When she does it correctly, centered on the ski, she has all the time in the world.
    </p>
    <p>
    If you teach her @ JD this year I hope you get more agressive with your coaching!
    </p>
  • HortonHorton Posts: 29,127 Administrator
    I am happy to hear that. I struggle with some kids becasue we let them off the hook for a while and then when we change the rules they look at us like we are crazy. I think Pinky is at a level where it is not as bad but my brother thinks I am wrong about what I tell his daughter. For her it is getting to be a bigger issue.

     

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  • tsixamtsixam Posts: 371 Baller
    <span><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">I think the fundamentals are important when I tech kids or beginners. I really try to have them to do the right things. But it is also very important to be aware of, that is very hard for a kid or any beginner to do what we tell them. It takes some time for their body & mind to understand what we are trying to teach them. I think the most important factors for progress are time on the water and above all, having fun! </font></font></font></span><span><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Tsixam</font></font></font></span>
  • Chuck_DickeyChuck_Dickey Posts: 1,462 Crazy Baller
    <p>
    John,
    </p>
    <p>
    Are you talking about Homer? 
    </p>
    <p>
    As far as Pinky's instructions, I noticed you were much more forceful with her about body position in trick than in slalom. I think you just have to be as forceful as your student will allow. Some need gentle coaxing and some of us need the boot camp method.  I would not do well at Lucky Lowe's.
    </p>
    <p>
    Yes, kids (and us) need strength and repetition to do well, but technique wins out over strength. I learned everything the wrong way in skiing and golf, now I'm trying to relearn the right way and it's very tough. Had I had the correct instructions in the formative years I'd be far better off.
    </p>
    <p>
    OK, off the box!
    </p>
  • HortonHorton Posts: 29,127 Administrator
    <p class="MsoNormal">
    <font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000">I am talking about Ellie. With tricks I am sure what I should tell Pinky or other preteens. Trick coaching is the same to me no matter how big you are. With slalom I am tempted to allow kids to do some things wrong that I would never allow an adult to do. I think this temptation is wrong but I am just a little unsure. </font>
    </p>
    <font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000"> </font>
    <p class="MsoNormal">
    <font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Classic example is that I wanted to teach Ellie last year to get her body more in line but when she did she launched off the wakes and claimed to have too much speed. In a few years and w/ 20 more pounds everything will be different. <span> </span></font></font></font>
    </p>
    <font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000"> </font>
    <p class="MsoNormal">
    <font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#000000">So the question is<span>  </span>. . . are the rules/priorities the same for skiers under 100 lbs? </font>
    </p>

     

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  • tsixamtsixam Posts: 371 Baller
    <span><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">I think the rules are the same but maybe not the priorities. It´s important to strive for a “basic relaxed position” but kids or any beginner (I don´t think the weight matters that much) don´t have the confidence to do it right. Very often when a kid have a strong good position and create speed they let up at or before the first wake, afraid to take a hit, and ski right to the next ball with even worse body position than before. I think the priorities should be to help them to ski the whole course. Overlooking the position and have them to pull a little bit too long instead, with less speed, since speed can be a fear factor. As they get more experience and strength they will gradually build the confidence it takes to be centred over the ski with hips forward.</font></font></font></span><span><font size="3"><font color="#000000"><font face="Times New Roman">Tsixam</font></font></font></span>
  • Chuck_DickeyChuck_Dickey Posts: 1,462 Crazy Baller
    <p>
    Launching is caused by hitting the wake flat and or with stiff legs, right?
    </p>
    <p>
    Fear factor is right on! When Pinky does it correctly, she slices through the wake and then the look of surprise hits her face. Then she has a bit of trouble with the speed coming into the next ball.
    </p>
    <p>
    IMHO, teach them the correct positions from the start and drill it in as much as they can take it.
    </p>
    <p>
    Maybe a better way to put it is, explain and enforce in the most palatable way for each student.
    </p>
  • eleeskieleeski Posts: 3,975 Infinite Pandas
    <p>
    Kids DO need different instruction. Some things are the same no matter what - balance and thinking ahead. But the details are very different.
    </p>
    <p>
    The ski handling is so different when you are slow or light that unique styles are needed. Speed management is totally different for John than for Ellie - few of John's most important cues will be relevant for Ellie. The wakes are nothing for John but present a big and hard obstacle for Ellie. And John (at twice the weight on 5% more ski area) will have no problem forcing the ski to turn while Ellie"s biggest problem might be getting the ski to turn fast enough (maybe she needs a Leeski?).
    </p>
    <p>
    As she grows, your coaching focus will have to change. What might be a "bad habit" for John is perfect form for Ellie this year. But as she grows she will have to keep learning.
    </p>
    <p>
    Get the kids the buoy count - no matter what style it takes. When they expect to run a pass, find the technique to fit - even if you might have to change that technique in a few years. Of course, "West coast" is just "kid style" that Marcus just never grew out of. 
    </p>
    <p>
    Eric
    </p>
    <p>
    Coach of Kirk who is GREAT in slalom relative to the small number of slalom sets he has taken in practice.
    </p>
    <p>
     
    </p>
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