What handles last the longest

LK_skierLK_skier Posts: 115 Baller
I've used Radar and HO - now I'm thinking Masterline but is it going to last longer given the increase in price? I'm not considering performance really as I've never really had issues with grip.
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Comments

  • aupatkingaupatking Posts: 1,795 Mega Baller
    In-Tow spectra handles are the best I’ve used. Masterline are good, but fray and the handle rubber wears faster. I have tried HO, Radar, Masterline, and In-Tow. They are all good products but the In-Tow handles have been the best, by a wide margin
    skihacker2ValveshoeskimanBGrow76
  • BroussardBroussard Posts: 765 Mega Baller
    @aupatking Interesting. I find the rubber on the Masterline handles wear way better than my In-Tow.
    Andre Broussard | Action Water Sports | WakeHouse | SkiBennetts |
  • Spencer_ShultzSpencer_Shultz Posts: 45 Baller
    @LK_skier I have had the same Masterline handle for going on 5 years. I’ve had it restrung twice where my ski wears against it. Overall, really happy.
    Only thing I’m not happy about is that I bought an identical handle as a back up and I probably haven’t used it more than ten times 🤣
  • sgreggsgregg Posts: 44 Baller
    In-Tow 👍
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    @LK_skier what are you asking about lasting? The rubber or the bridle? The wear of the rubber depends on a couple of factors. One are the gloves that are used. Kevlar gloves will decrease the wear of any handle grip. The Kevlar I’ve very abrasive. The Amara gloves will allow the rubber to have better wear and last longer. The bridle wear really depends on the ski you ride and how sharp the edges are. In time any ski will cause a bridle to wear. It does not matter who built the handle.
    In Tow may use a softer rubber the Masterline or Radar and HO. and vise verse. Handles are all personal. Get what feels comfortable.
    skierjp
  • aupatkingaupatking Posts: 1,795 Mega Baller
    @Broussard really? I wonder if it’s just a timing thing on what quality rubber you get and when? I have a Masterline I used for a season and an In-Tow I’ve used for 3. Both with Kevlar gloves. My Masterline has deep hand grooves where my first In-Tow has almost none
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    edited March 1
    @aupatking the handle diameter will also affect the wear. Bigger handles may not wear as well but feel softer in the grip.
  • GolfguyGolfguy Posts: 276 Crazy Baller
    Speaking of bridal wear, why don't ski manufactures bevel the top edge of the ski where it would contact the rope. Would there be a performance issue?

    Just curious.
  • JackQJackQ Posts: 510 Open or Level 9 Skier
    Keep in mind that most handles have the same aluminum core, so a thicker diameter handle has more rubber to wear. Additionally if you need to have the handle restrung have the handle rotated so you wear the other “side” of the handle.
  • 6balls6balls Posts: 6,112 Mega Baller
    equivocal stuff. I'm hard on ropes and handles--have run masterline handles and in-tow ropes, but for many years also ran masterline ropes. They are all good.
    Dave Ross--die cancer die
    slow
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,814 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    I know! I know! The handle you don’t use wears the least!

    I agree with @dave2ball that how long your handle lasts depends on which glove you use, but there is another side of the equation. I use the Radar Kevlar Boa glove size small and if the stitching doesn’t give out I can get through a year of skiing with two pair of gloves. At $90 per, that’s $180 for gloves and let’s just say $150 for a handle that, due to the Kevlar gloves, last a year. Annual cost totals $330. If I use the Amara gloves, I burn through a pair a month to six weeks, but I’ll get two years out of my handle. At $80 per for the gloves and let’s just say six pair a year and $75 for that same $150 handle amortized over two years the cost is $480 +75=$555. So in my experience, it’s about $225 cheaper annually to tear up handles than it is to burn through gloves.
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
    DeanoskiMike GileDaveD
  • DonTDonT Posts: 79 Baller
    it will be interesting to see how in-tow's new handle "The blue bomb" feels/holds up. Sounds like they will be available some time this month.
    ALPJrKeith_Menard
  • Vernon ReeveVernon Reeve Posts: 114 Baller
    I use Proline Tractor Grip Radius and it has lasted a few years now with no wear. I think the tractor grip prevents the hands from sliding across the rubber, so it doesn't wear as fast. I also use non-kevlar gloves, so that's probably part of it. The kevlar gloves were too stiff in really cold water, which made it hard to grip the handle. The tractor grip sure makes it easy to hang on to. No issues with blisters. I only ski about 3 times a week however.
  • LK_skierLK_skier Posts: 115 Baller
    @dave2ball good question - I've never had issues with the bridle rubbing the ski so I was only concerned with rubber grip holding up. And yep the Kevlar gloves don't help!
  • Stevie BoyStevie Boy Posts: 2,376 ★★★★Quad Panda Award Recipient ★★★★
    Here is my take on Handles/Gloves, Kevlar Gloves are going to wear the handle out quicker than Palm Gloves.
    The Handle will last longer with Palm Gloves but Palm Gloves will wear out quicker than Kevlar Gloves.
    End Result Is, you are going to be replacing either Handles or Gloves.

    Looking Forward To Getting On The Water, It Has Been A Bleak Winter

    6ballsslow
  • skierjpskierjp Posts: 1,234 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    @LK_skier exactly what Dave2ball says. It also depends on what level skier you are.
  • skierjpskierjp Posts: 1,234 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    @dave2ball I forget, how many sets does a pro skier ski before they recommend getting a new rope?
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    edited March 2
    @skierjp I have have been told some pro skiers change out around 60 sets.
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,814 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    I have seen pro skiers use a rope every day for a year. My Masterline Optimized 2 rope is a year old and shows little sign of wear or stiffness. I think the “60 set rule” is malarkey. Who goes through 6 ropes a year? Not me…
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    edited March 2
    @lpskier the question was not directed to us the amateur. But how often do the the pros change out. We do not place the same load on ropes as the pros do. I go through 3 -4 ropes a year. Most skiers don’t know when the rope has lost there life. Wear is not the only sign.
  • BS74BS74 Posts: 251 Baller
    As long as the rubber is not twisting, re-string from the other side. When you get new ropes save the 15 off segment to re-string. I've had handles almost ware to the metal on one side and then rotate it. Been doing this for 35 years.
    Cam
  • mike_mapplemike_mapple Posts: 272 Water Ski Industry Professional
    My dad would use one rope a year @dave2ball Unless he gave one away to someone who needed a rope. Pretty much always masterline as long as I can remember. He went through handles though, have a box full of just bars.
    Perfski.com
    407-859-7544
    [email protected]
    [email protected]

    If you have a blister, pop it, pour some lemon juice on it, and then add salt. -Andy Mapple
    6ballsBGrow76
  • teammalibuteammalibu Posts: 1,213 Mega Baller
    My Masterline Ergo has held up really well 2 seasons and still in great shape! I do have to make sure that the area where the ski rubs when I get up has extra protection!
    Mike Erb Cedar Ridge Canton Miss.
    Horton is my hero
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    @mike_mapple the brand of rope was not mentioned as to when they were changing out. Maybe these skiers were very particular. This is just info passing along from a question.
  • mike_mapplemike_mapple Posts: 272 Water Ski Industry Professional
    @dave2ball Sorry my response was not a call out what so ever, just giving the info that I know of. A lot has changed as well so I do not doubt it. I tell people in the shop all the time, if your mind is telling you to change it, then just do it, as skiing is just as much mental as it is physical.
    Perfski.com
    407-859-7544
    [email protected]
    [email protected]

    If you have a blister, pop it, pour some lemon juice on it, and then add salt. -Andy Mapple
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    @mike_mapple all good. Yes a lot has changes.
  • lpskierlpskier Posts: 3,814 ★★★Triple Panda Award Recipient ★★★
    @dave2ball Agreed. My tell that my rope needs replacing is when I start feeling my elbows after I ski.
    John Wilkins- Si non pro sanguine quem ludus ne. #iskiconnelly
    Skoot1123
  • dave2balldave2ball Posts: 1,073 Crazy Baller
    @lpskier that is a good signal.
  • CentCent Posts: 262 Baller
    In-Tow has given me my best durability.
  • 6balls6balls Posts: 6,112 Mega Baller
    Back in the day I replaced 'em (ropes) when I broke 'em--usually 3-4 per season--right at the wake in the heart of the pull--shot to the ribs.
    @razorskier1 once broke 3 ropes in one day--both the ropes we had in the boat and the new one we purchased cuz we were out of ropes. I broke two in one day in a ski team demo near downtown Iowa City.
    We kept broken handles in our bedroom as "trophies"--hung them on the wall. I broke the tournament rope at collegiate regionals.
    As our technique improved--finally got some coaching--we basically stopped breaking ropes/handles. We could run a season on a rope. Wear point seemed to often be pylon attachment.
    I've had in-tow/masterline ropes for the most part, but masterline handles for many years--seem very durable.
    Dave Ross--die cancer die
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