fastest turns

alex38alex38 Posts: 539 Baller
edited February 2011 in Technique & Theory
<p>
Ok, I must be getting anxious for the ice to let go.
</p>
<p>
Question: Are shortline 36mph slalom turns the fastest turns in any sport?
</p>
<p>
I know there are some bio-mechanic-aqua-engineer-physic junkies out there that can tear this apart.
</p>
<p>
For myself: I think the lucidity of water allows for the quickest change of direction. Has to be faster than skis or board on snow, has to be faster than indy racer. I know at 34.2 32 off my ski turns faster than I can think.
</p>
<p>
But how can it be measured?
</p>
<p>
Feel free to squash or support anything I may blabber about his sport.
</p>

Comments

  • Bud ManBud Man Posts: 254
    edited February 2011
    <p class="MsoNormal">
    <font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000">Alex38,</font>
    </p>
    <p class="MsoNormal">
    <font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000">I realize your post is about comparing turns in different sports, but I thought I might throw this in. Back in the 90’s and earlier, I think the school of thought for that old tech equipment was to turn fast. I remember demoing and buying a CDX1 in 2000 because it turned so fast. </font>
    </p>
    <p>
    <font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000">But now with the new tech equipment, I believe we do not want to turn fast. For me, breaking that old habit of turning fast is hard. </font>
    </p>
    <p>
    <font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000">My main focus in training right now is slowing down my turns.</font><font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000"> </font><font face="Calibri" size="3" color="#000000">I think it is easier to get by with unnecessarily fast turns on longer lines, but the line gets past 14.25m the more important slow turns are. </font>
    </p>
  • DWDW Posts: 2,439 Mega Baller
    Nope, a short track speed skater creates a harder higher g turn than on a water ski.  Direction change of a water ski is quick but not that quick.  Also, just using speed as a parameter, a Formula one or full ground effects race car (prototype or Indy car) will generate more g forces and certainly go faster in a corner (different radius) than a water skier.  An ultimate load machine would be an F16 or F22, it will easily knock the occupant unconscious during a hard cornering manouver, they will pull 9 g's sustained or so and certainly speed is not even close and I would certainly consider flying one of those "the ultimate sport".  I did some very coarse calculations and a water skier in a ski course pulls 2 g's or so.  F1 and Indy cars are 5+/-.
  • Ed_JohnsonEd_Johnson Posts: 2,297
    <div>
    As someone who has spent a major portion of my life flying jet fighters, 2 combat tours, and driven a lot of race cars, including Indy Cars, I can testify to the fact that Slalom skiing has a lot in common. That common ingredient is "INTENSITY". There are few sports that require that much concentration and physical effort in 16.95 seconds. Then, whenever you think you may have it figured out, just shorten the rope. More intensity and quicker reactions. The challenge is always there.
    </div>
    <div>
    </div>
    <div>
    Also, if you screw up in any of these, the result can be quite painful.
    </div>
    <div>
    </div>
    <div>
    I have enjoyed skiing since I was 8 years old and over 50 years later, enjoy the challenge and excitement more than ever. Including the unique people you get to share this with.
    </div>
    <div>
    </div>
    <div>
    Check Six,   ED
    </div>
    Special Thanks to Performance Ski and Surf and the Denali Adam's !!!
  • I am with you Ed! 53 Years later, I love it more than ever! BTW If you have never seen Wim Decree turn 1, 3 and 5 ball at 39 then you are missing something!
Sign In or Register to comment.